Someone Hanging from a Bridge

Some 26 Greenpeace USA activists helped form the 40-hour blockade that stopped Shell’s icebreaker from leaving port.
Then they came down from the St. Johns Bridge in Portland, Oregon.

An activist looks towards the rising sun as she hangs from the St. Johns bridge as part of a protest to block the  Royal Dutch Shell PLC icebreaker Fennica from leaving for Alaska in Portland, Ore., Thursday, July 30, 2015. The icebreaker, which is a vital part of Shell's exploration and spill-response plan off Alaska's northwest coast, stopped short of the hanging blockade, turned around and sailed back to a dock at the Port of Portland. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

An activist looks towards the rising sun as she hangs from the St. Johns bridge as part of a protest to block the Royal Dutch Shell PLC icebreaker Fennica from leaving for Alaska in Portland, Ore., Thursday, July 30, 2015. The icebreaker, which is a vital part of Shell’s exploration and spill-response plan off Alaska’s northwest coast, stopped short of the hanging blockade, turned around and sailed back to a dock at the Port of Portland. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

The climbers who caused Royal Dutch Shell’s icebreaker, the Fennica, to turn around and return to port after a spectacular face-off was reported on live around the world.

Annie Leonard the Executive Director of Greenpeace USA said:

We are incredibly proud of these climbers and truly humbled by what they have achieved here in Portland.

“The last two days have been a very emotional experience for all of us at Greenpeace, as well as all those who supported this action around the country and the world. Between the kayativists, the streamers, and the blue sky we have seen something new emerge, a sign that we can stand up to one of the most powerful companies in the world if we work together.

“This was a historic achievement not just because it blocked Shell’s icebreaker from reaching the Arctic, but because it helped spark an even bigger movement of people to raise their voices for something they believe in.

“Drilling for oil in the Arctic Ocean would be a terrible mistake, and we call on President Obama to join the millions of people who are speaking with one voice to say it loud and clear: ShellNo.”

 

The controversial oil ship, the Fennica, managed to sail past a group of Greenpeace  protesters after police and Coast Guard officers forced the activists from the area.

The protestors were hanging from a bridge in Portland, Oregon.

Streamers float in the wind under the St. Johns Bridge In as activists climbed under the bridge in an attempt to prevent the Shell leased icebreaker, MSV Fennica from joining the rest of Shell's Artctic drilling fleet. T According to the latest federal permit, the Fennica must be at Shell’s drill site before Shell can reapply for federal approval to drill deep enough for oil in the Chukchi Sea.

Streamers float in the wind under the St. Johns Bridge In as activists climbed under the bridge in an attempt to prevent the Shell leased icebreaker, MSV Fennica from joining the rest of Shell’s Artctic drilling fleet. T According to the latest federal permit, the Fennica must be at Shell’s drill site before Shell can reapply for federal approval to drill deep enough for oil in the Chukchi Sea.

Protesters gathered to block a Royal Dutch Shell icebreaking vessel.

The ship was leaving port to head to an oil drilling site in the Arctic.

Some suspended themselves from the St. Johns Bridge.

Some formed a line of kayaks along the Willamette River to block the ship from leaving.

But the Fennica, slipped through a gap in the dangling protesters.
For six hours the “kayaktivists” and climbers held fast.
A judge fined Greenpeace USA $2,500 for every hour that protesters blocked the Fennica from passing .

Portland police and Coast Guard officers forced the activists from the area.
Bridge 3

Some dangled 40 hours in hope to block the Fennica from returning to sea.

They suspended themselves from one famous bridge.

For a brief moment they blocked the essential support vessel from traveling north.
The Fennica moved closer, the airborne protesters, joined by kayakers below, held their airspace.

The Fennica turned about and went back to its dock.

With armed authority the Fennica came again.

Kayaktivists moved toward the center of the river as the ship began its final trip.

Members of the Portland Fire Bureau’s technical rescue rope team built their own rope system.
… to force the climbers down.

Authorities in boats and personal watercraft finally cleared the narrow pathway for the Fennica.

She passed beneath the St. John Bridge to open water.

There was still someone hanging from a bridge.

 

I occupy my Faith with the action of changing the world.
My Faith is occupied with the action in changing the world.

My state of being is occupied by Faith.
Faith occupies my state of being.

My time is occupied by Faith.
Faith occupies my time.

Faith possess me.
I am possessed by Faith.

My position and my function is my Faith.
My Faith is my function and my position.

I reside in and I own my Faith.
My Faith resides in me and owns me.

(So… what is my Faith?)

 

 

 

Leave a Reply